Altair is committed to its responsibility for processing information it receives under the principles set forth in all applicable laws, including the UK’s ICO[1] and EU Data Commission regulations, and the Privacy Shield Framework.  These responsibilities include the onward transfer of information received from the EU, UK, and/or Swiss confederation.

  • EU/Swiss Confederation Citizens and Residents Privacy Rights

Some of the countries where Altair provides services may not have the equivalent level of data protection laws as those in your location; if We need to transfer personal data outside of the EEA or Swiss Confederation, We will take steps to make sure your personal data is protected and safeguard prior to removal.  In particular, We require third parties to whom We transfer your data to agree to abide by the Standard Contractual Clauses approved by the European Commission and permitted under Article 46 of the European Union General Data Protection Regulations.  If you wish to obtain the details of such safeguards, you can request them from the Data Protection Officer at [email protected]

  • Privacy Shield Framework

Despite the decision in Schrems II[2], Altair continues to participate in and abide by the EU-and Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework established by the U.S. Department of Commerce, European Commission, and Swiss Administration, respectively.  Privacy Shield addresses the collection, use, and retention of personal information transferred from the European Union and/or Swiss Confederation to the United States.  If there is any conflict between the general terms in this privacy statement and the more specific Privacy Shield Principles, the Privacy Shield Principles shall govern.  To learn more about the Privacy Shield program, and to view Our certification, please visit https://www.privacyshield.gov/list.

Under the Privacy Shield Frameworks, Altair is also subject to the regulatory enforcement powers of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.  In certain situations, Altair may be required to disclose personal information in response to lawful requests by public authorities, including compliance with national security or law enforcement requirements.  Should you have a dispute involving data processed between Altair and the EU or Swiss Confederation, you may contact the International Centre for Dispute Resolution® and/or American Arbitration Association (for non-human resources data)

Under certain conditions, more fully described on the Privacy Shield website https://www.privacyshield.gov/article?id=How-to-Submit-a-Complaint, you may be entitled to invoke binding arbitration when other dispute resolution procedures have been exhausted.  Once invoked, an individual may lose the option to seek relief for the same claimed violation in another forum.  For more information about binding arbitration, please visit:  https://osec.doc.gov/opog/privacy/default.html

  • State Residents’ Privacy Rights

Residents of an increasing number of States within the United States have the right to request that companies provide you with information regarding the parties’ to whom We may disclose your personal information.  Under the California Consumer Privacy Act[3] (“CCPA”), residents generally have a right to Opt-out or Opt-in to the use of personal information by third parties for direct marketing purposes.  Visit [insert hyperlink to CCPA Policy] to learn more about your privacy rights.  If you are a resident of any other state and want to know how to exercise your rights, you may send your request to [email protected]

[1] The Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”) is an independent regulatory office dealing with the Data Protection Act 2018 General Data Protection Regulation and the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 across the UK; the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and, to a limited extent, in Scotland.

[2] Court of Justice of the European Union decision in the case Data Protection Commission v. Facebook Ireland, Schrems (July 2016)

[3] Cal. Civ. Code §1798.01, et. seq. (2018)